Frank’s Cock

1993
8.0'
CA
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Synopsis

In Frank’s Cock, actor Callum Rennie plays a man who shares his memory of the lover he lost to AIDS. The screen is separated in quadrants, a visual technique that allows the spectator to navigate the narrator’s account. In the upper-right hand corner, Rennie’s monologue plays out while the other three spaces are filled with images of gay pornography, of medical films and of art pieces. Jack Rusholme wrote, in the preface of his retrospective book on Hoolboom’s work, that this fragmentation is reminiscent of the effects of AIDS, which breaks the body into dispersed vantages (1), while the narration serves to "bind with words what this disease will render lifeless and inert." (1)

The film was well received nationally and internationally, winning, amongst other prizes, a Golden Leopard at the Locarno International Film Festival in Locarno, Switzerland. Thomas Waugh places Frank’s Cock as one of the “great AIDS triptych” (2) together with his other films Letters from Home (1996) and Positiv(1997).

(1)Rusholme, Jack (1994). "How to Die: The Films of Mike Hoolboom". Experimenta.org (Experimenta Media Arts). Archived from the original on 20 August 2012.

Waugh, Thomas (2002). "Mike Hoolboom and the Second Generation of AIDS Films in Canada". In Beard, William; White, Jerry. North of Everything : English-Canadian Cinema since 1980. Edmonton: University of Alberta Press. pp. 416–429.

 

Major prizes
Best Canadian Short Film, Toronto International Festival, 1994
Golden Leopard, Locarno Film Festival, 1994
Best Dramatic Film, Ann Arbor Film Festival, 1994
Best Gay/Lesbian Film, Albany International Festival, 1995
Award, Interfilm Festival, Berlin, 1995
Second Prize Experimental, Big Muddy Festival, 1995
Honorable Mention, University of Oregon Queer Film Fest, 1994